RF


Alan Silvestri
The Avengers

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chrishemsworth:

The Avengers Soundtrack Score (2012)

Track #19 - “The Avengers” by Alan Silvestri

That man on the bridge, I knew him…

emptyfantasies asked: Walter White or White Walkers?

Funny comments in Fantastic Beasts & Where to Find Them 

”[…] so you had best pray again, Sansa, and for a different outcome.”

kaargue:

escape!!

So the question is not, exactly, “Why change the books?” Because the answer is clear: Many, many details must be changed, just to make the transition from book series to televised series work. The question is, instead: “Why change this?” Why make a scene from the book that depicts consensual sex into one in the show that depicts rape?

Rape of Thrones · For Our Consideration · The A.V. Club

Thank god for the A.V. Club, the only media outlet that has outright called bullshit on this so far.

And another really important quote:

Rape is a tricky thing to use as character development, for either the victim or the rapist; doing it twice raises a lot of red flags. It assumes that rape between characters doesn’t fundamentally change the rest of their story—and it assumes that the difference between consent and rape is, to use the parlance, a “blurred line.”

(via mythandrists)

harry potter; color analysis

In the end, Captain America does not make the heroic sacrifice, thus further proving that Black Widow can handle the emotional weight of being a lead character. As if anyone could really forget the most quoted line in “The Avengers” — “I’ve got red in my ledger; I’d like to wipe it out” — it helps to have that line fresh in your mind when deconstructing what Widow does in the final act of what’s billed as a Captain America movie. Black Widow doesn’t wipe out the red in her ledger. No, she blasts her ledger out to the world, like it was the grisliest email forward of all time. We know from her heart to heart with Hawkeye that the shame she feels about what she’s done is real, and she hesitates when she realizes that taking down the bad guys means revealing her secrets. But she does it anyway, because she’s not just a spy anymore; she’s a super hero, and she makes a super hero’s sacrifice.

x (via jediemma)

To me the clones represent the many way our lives could go - the many possibilities for any one person. And to me it’s interesting at the end of season one, we find out that the clones have been patented. That always resonated for me as a woman to have this idea of our bodies not being our own. There’s this media ownership over the images of women’s bodies and there’s such an emphasis on your body representing who you are and defining who you are and also fitting into a specific box. I feel that’s a very resonant theme for young women like myself, and especially women in this industry.

— Tatiana Maslany on the themes of identity & personhood in Orphan Black (x)